Posted in: Events

Brighton Comedy Festival review: ‘Dara O Briain: Crowd Tickler’

About three seconds. That’s how long it takes from Dara O Briain’s first appearance on stage to his having the audience in his total command. He crams more belly laughs into every ten minutes than other acts might manage in a full sixty minute set, which is even more impressive when you realise he’s on...

Brighton Comedy Festival review: David O’Doherty

David O’Doherty arrives, as presumably he always has done, seemingly somewhat surprised to see us. The keyboard is at hand, although not used constantly throughout the hour, as he gets distracted by one thought process colliding into another. He warns us, in an entirely casual and low rent way, that he’s getting too big for...

Brighton Comedy Festival review: ‘Frisky & Mannish: Just Too Much’

There’s a very good sketch in the series Big Train in which adoring fans won’t let Ralph McTell escape the shadow of his most famous song. The audience aren’t interested in the new, original stuff, only happy when he’s revisiting old hits. It’s a risk that Frisky & Mannish are acutely aware of – they...

‘Sinatra: The Man and his Music’ show review

Thanks to the wonders of modern technology, death is no longer the bar to filling the London Palladium that it once was. Equipped with a technical presentation barely dreamt of when he died in the late 1990s, Sinatra can still own the stage backed by a twenty-five piece orchestra and fourteen dancers. The show is...

‘Avenue Q’ musical review: The delinquent stepchild of ‘Sesame Street’

You’ll have heard of Avenue Q before, of course; the delinquent boozy stepchild of Sesame Street from the co-creator of Book of Mormon. Following five years in London’s West End, this supremely confident production (in Brighton all this week) absolutely nails the energetic perkiness and gawsh-darned American-ness that’s required to make Avenue Q work. One...

‘Impossible’ review: A great night out at new West End magic show

Londons’s West End has a history of enthralling magic shows which has seen daring performances from the likes of Harry Houdini, Penn & Teller and, erm, Paul Daniels. With CGI making audiences ever more cynical about what’s real, you’d be forgiven for thinking magic shows had become extinct. But this month, magic and illusion have...

‘Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular’ review (Cardiff)

Showcasing the best of Murray Gold’s music from Season 8, plus a few well-known fan favourites, the Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular has finally reached the UK. The tour started in Wembley at the weekend before crossing the country to Cardiff, or as Peter Davison described it, ‘the beating heart of Doctor Who.’ Finally the orchestra...

‘Spamalot’ musical review

It’s odd, the boxes we put people in. Joe Pasquale is generally thought of as a squeaky-voiced light entertainment performer, Todd Carty is often considered a depressed barrow boy (or an overly cheerful school kid, depending on your age), and Monty Python is regarded as the summit of all sketch shows. It’s this last that’s...

‘My Night With Reg’ play review

Revisiting Kevin Elyot’s 1994 drama, My Night With Reg, after twenty years, it’s striking how the play both epitomises and transcends its period. Telling the story of six friends knit together by a shared history, the shadow of the AIDS epidemic and sexual encounters with the titular Reg, the play sparks with pathos, heart and...